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Department of Cognitive Science

Collaborative remembering: When can remembering with others be beneficial?

Celia B. Harris (charris@maccs.mq.edu.au)
Paul G. Keil
John Sutton
Amanda J. Barnier
Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney

Abstract

Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our results in terms of a functional view of collaborative remembering, and consider when and in what ways remembering with others might help or hinder memory.

Citation details for this article:

Harris, C., Keil, P., Sutton, J., Barnier, A. (2010). Collaborative Remembering: When Can Remembering With Others Be Beneficial? In W. Christensen, E. Schier, and J. Sutton (Eds.), ASCS09: Proceedings of the 9th Conference of the Australasian Society for Cognitive Science (pp. 131-134). Sydney: Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science.

DOI: 10.5096/ASCS200921
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