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Department of Cognitive Science

Dr Shahd Al-Janabi

BA Psych Macq, BA Psych UWA, PhD Macq.

Shahd Al-Janabi

PhD Student

Contact Details

email : aljanabs@uwm.edu

External Address

SNAP Lab
School of Psychology
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

I also have a profile at the ARC Centre for Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders.

Profile

I obtained a Bachelor of Arts (Psychology - Honours) from the University of Western Australia in 2009. My Honours research was conducted under the supervision of Professor Gill Rhodes, in collaboration with Professor Colin MacLeod, and investigated attentional allocation to own and other race faces. I joined CCD in 2010 as a PhD candidate supervised by Dr. Matthew Finkbeiner and Dr. Paul Sowman.

Thesis Details

Constraints on attentional orienting by symbolic and abrupt onset cues as revealed through masking.

Eye gaze following is vital for smooth social interactions as it can indicate sources of threat, underlying attitudes, points of interest and so on. As such, itís not so surprising that infants begin to follow another personís gaze from 4 months of age. Given the early development of this gaze following ability, my research is concerned with investigating whether the capacity to follow eye-gaze information is automatic (innate) or top-down (learnt). To investigate this question, we ask, can gaze following occur when the gaze information is non-conscious? If so, is gaze following under non-conscious conditions driven by similar mechanisms to gaze following under conscious conditions? Further, do the same neural underpinnings govern non-concious and conscious gaze following? We investigate these research questions using both behavioural (response latency) measures and electroencephalography (EEG).

  • Scholarship : Other
  • Workload : full time
  • Supervisors : Associate Professor Matthew Finkbeiner and Dr Paul Sowman

Selected Publications

Periodicals

  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2014). Responding to the direction of the eyes: In search of the masked gaze-cueing effect. Attention, Perception and Psychophysics, 76, 148-161. doi:10.3758/s13414-013-0570-6
  • Al-Janabi, S., Nickels, L.A., Sowman, P.F., BurianovŠ, H., Merrett, D.L., & Thompson, W.F. (2014). Augmenting melodic intonation therapy with non-invasive brain stimulation to treat impaired left-hemisphere function: two case studies. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 37. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2014.00037
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2012). Effective processing of masked eye gaze requires volitional control. Experimental Brain Research, 216(3), 433-443. doi: 10.1007/s00221-011-2944-0
  • Al-Janabi, S., MacLeod, C., & Rhodes, G. (2012). Non-threatening other-race faces capture visual attention: Evidence from a dot-probe task. PLoS One, 7(10), e46119. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0046119

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Thompson, W.F., Sowman, P., Nickels, L., Al-Janabi, S., Merrett, D., & Savage, G. (2013, August). Melodic intonation therapy: Is it an effective treatment for non-fluent aphasia? Paper presented at the Biannual meeting of the Society for Music Perception and Cognition (SMPC), Toronto, Canada.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2013, April). Re-defining the hallmarks of exogenous attention by non-conscious cues. Paper presented at the 40th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Adelaide.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2012, September). Effective processing of masked eye gaze requires volitional control. Paper presented at the 35th European Conference of Visual Perception (ECVP), Alghero, Italy.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2012, April). Effective processing of masked eye gaze requires volitional control. Paper presented at the 39th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Sydney.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2011, December). Effective processing of masked eye gaze requires volitional control. Poster session presented at the Australasian Cognitive Neurosciences Conference (ACNC), Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
  • Quek, G., Finkbeiner, M., Friedman, J., & Al-Janabi, S. (2011, December). Using reaching trajectories to reveal the dynamics of stimulus categorization. Paper presented at the Australasian Cognitive Neurosciences Conference (ACNC), Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2011, December). Effective processing of masked eye gaze requires volitional control. Paper presented at the 2012 Higher Degree Research Showcase (HDR Showcase), Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
  • Al-Janabi, S., & Finkbeiner, M. (2011, April). Do eye-gaze cues automatically orient spatial attention? Evidence from a masked-cueing task. Paper presented at the 38th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Auckland, New Zealand.